Adopting new technology is often a top-down process, with someone in management going through an analysis of where efficiencies can be created and then scouring the market or asking fellow agency owners how they solved this or that problem through the use of a new application.

While all of that is critical leading up to the purchase of new technology, one of the most critical pieces of input you need is from your end user.

To be effective in your business, the new solution has to be useful, it has to be usable, and ultimately, it has to be used. Here are some steps you can take to involve your users in assessing technological needs, identifying solutions and implementing the new platform.

Getting buy in

There is nothing more critical in decision making in a company than getting employees buy in. This is true for the big picture commitment to the company’s business goals and objectives down to culture issues like appropriate dress codes.

Handing down directives is never as effective as collaborating with employees to establish objectives in a way that they can accept and support. This is as true for introducing new technology as it is for establishing a new PTO policy.

Employees need to know why. One of the best ways to get buy in for a new solution is to tie it to already established business goals, whether that is to create greater efficiencies, save money or better serve your customers. When employees understand the “why” they are more apt to get onboard more eagerly.

Start with the users

In some companies, the user is the last one to know what’s coming, and that can create resistance right out of the box. Employees who are going to be using the technology should be brought in on early discussions.

Management may think they know how processes are being managed. IT departments may think they understand how current platforms are being used. But only the end users really know what that looks like. Bringing impacted staff in from the beginning can provide far greater insight into how the application may integrate with existing systems and intersect with embedded processes.

Early involvement can also create heightened interest in the potential of the application and a greater sense of loyalty and commitment to the integration process.

Input into the planning process

There is always a learning curve with any new system that can for a period of time slow down everyone’s work pace. It’s important to understand how best to introduce and integrate it most effectively without interrupting the work at hand.

This could be as simple as doing the integration over the weekend or working with the users to identify when work demands are at their lowest ebb in the month. When the pace of work is a little slower, employees have the luxury of really delving into the application to learn all it has to offer, so when work picks back up again, they are ready to fly with it.

The truth is there are always going to be eager early adopters of technology in the workplace as well as skeptics and late adopters who out of fear of change may be hesitant to get on board. The more enthusiasm and involvement you can create around a change the more likely you will be successful in your integration.

At VisionX we understand the challenges of integrating new technology and have designed our VisionX Fees to integrate tightly with popular platforms in the title and mortgage industries, making incorporating VizionX Fees into your workflows easy and seamless. Call us today to learn more.

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